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#34168 - 01/21/07 05:50 PM Machinist engine measuring tools
HemiStan Offline
top fuel

Registered: 06/10/04
Posts: 1634
Loc: Virginia
Hello! I am looking to buy some machinist engine measuring tools. I really don't know exactly what I need but I would like to accurately measure all of my engine pieces before I assemble it. I guess that I would just like to double check what the machine shop did.

I'm assuming that I will need a set of outside micrometers, a set of inside micometers, and a digital caliper. Does anyone have any specific sets or tool brands they reccommend? I was looking at some used Lufkin and Starrett sets online but I really don't even know what to look for.

What do you guys use? Thanks!

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#34169 - 01/21/07 05:57 PM Re: Machinist engine measuring tools [Re: HemiStan]
Anonymous
Unregistered


a quality 2-3" and 4-5" micrometer and a quality dial bore guage that measures to .0001 is a good start. make sure the mices have the standards with them. forget the dial caliper for any truely accurate measurements. those are good to see if your in the ballpark, but that's about it.

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#34170 - 01/21/07 06:04 PM Re: Machinist engine measuring tools [Re: HemiStan]
Cab_Burge Offline
I Win

Registered: 08/23/03
Posts: 30798
Loc: Bend,OR USA
I don't use the measurements from my dial calipers or inside mikes as the gospel, I measure the inside mike I.D.(length) with my outside mikes and record the length and then measure the crankshaft journal or whatever I'm trying to find the clearance on with the outside mike and due the math for the actual clearances. If your going to check cam lift and degree the cam in you will also need a one inch travel dial indicator and mag. base dial indicator holder as well as a degree wheel marked in one degree increments for the full 360 degrees of the wheel, the larger wheels are easier to use and read. There are a lot of machinest tools that are nice to have but not absolutely got to have tools to do the basic checks on engiine clearances.
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Mr.Cab Racing and winning with Mopars since 1964. (Old F--t, Huh)

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#34171 - 01/21/07 06:25 PM Re: Machinist engine measuring tools [Re: Cab_Burge]
Billet426 Offline
mopar addict

Registered: 01/02/06
Posts: 529
Loc: Colo
Careful buying used measuring tools. It doesn't take much to screw them up. For value I have found these to be good...
http://www.jlindustrial.com/Precision_Measuring/Fowler/Micrometers/3761/4294966439/4294942759.html
Don't mind the retail price...never..ever buy measuring tools retail. If they aren't on sale today they will be tomorrow. Normally half or more off

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#34172 - 01/22/07 05:17 AM Re: Machinist engine measuring tools [Re: Billet426]
HemiStan Offline
top fuel

Registered: 06/10/04
Posts: 1634
Loc: Virginia
Sounds good. This is what I will be looking for:

A 2-3" and a 4-5" micrometer, and a dial bore guage. I currently have a dial indicator and a degree wheel.

It looks like I will stay away from the used tools.

Thanks!

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#34173 - 01/22/07 10:53 AM Re: Machinist engine measuring tools [Re: HemiStan]
RATTRAP Offline
pro stock

Registered: 03/28/05
Posts: 1386
Loc: N/E, Michigan
Quote:

Sounds good. This is what I will be looking for:

A 2-3" and a 4-5" micrometer, and a dial bore guage. I currently have a dial indicator and a degree wheel.

It looks like I will stay away from the used tools.

Thanks!




Borrow the tools dont buy, You will prob only use them the one time,A Good dial bore gauge is expensive,! Also have who ever you borrow them from show you the correct way to use them.

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#34174 - 01/22/07 11:22 AM Re: Machinist engine measuring tools [Re: RATTRAP]
dartman366 Online   content


Registered: 01/18/04
Posts: 13094
Loc: Mt. Vernon, Ohio
as far as buying inside and outside mic's, I have found that if you are intent on buying used tool's then buy from a old machinist that is retiring and check calibration date's/stickers,, if you find the right person they will lot's of time's show you the in's and out's of proper useage and care for the tool's, most of the old fella's that I have bought from are usually pretty understanding and are glad to see the tool's that they have made a living with for year's are going to a good home and will be taken care of properly.
_________________________
Light travels faster than the speed of sound,,,this is why some people seem bright untill you hear them speak.

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#34175 - 01/22/07 05:27 PM Re: Machinist engine measuring tools [Re: dartman366]
Anonymous
Unregistered


a very good point was brought up. owning your own tools is a good start, but learning how to use them is even more important. I've tried to teach people correct methods for consistent readings but it takes a long time to truely master. take your time and practice. you'd be surprised at how many people don't know how to read a mic, let alone use it properly. it's not rocket science but it is a learned trade like many other things. try to find someone to show you the basics that is knowledgeable and try to see if your readings are consistent with his/hers. practice until the tool becomes an extension of yourself.
i know of many people that have called their machinist to tell them they're measurements are off, only to be embarrassed. that's the best advice i can give anyone that has no experience with such tools. best of luck to you, we all had to learn the hard way at some point or another.


Edited by DRAM_Perf_Only (01/22/07 05:28 PM)

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#34176 - 01/22/07 07:35 PM Re: Machinist engine measuring tools
Anonymous
Unregistered


get a standard, practice on the standard until you get the feel of the turn on the handle.

Try learning on a .0001 or min .001 mike for the accuracy and feel.

A great place to get tools is from a retiring machinest, he/she will sell you his/her livelyhood reasonably if you convince him/her you will take care of the babies....

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#34177 - 01/23/07 04:50 AM Re: Machinist engine measuring tools
HemiStan Offline
top fuel

Registered: 06/10/04
Posts: 1634
Loc: Virginia
Excellent advice everyone! I really appreciate the responses. I have used micrometers a little (A&P aircraft mechanic school several years ago) but I would not consider myself proficient by any means.

I wouldn't consider myself a master engine builder either but I really enjoy doing all of my own work on every part of my cars. From paint, to glass, to transmissions, to engines. I currently have an engine that I had a well known shop do all of the machine work on but I have heard these crazy horror stories of substandard work and practices. I just want to be sure everything is in order before I put this beast together.

I do have an older uncle in New York that has been a machinist for most of his life. I haven't seen him for a few years but I will definetly get in contact with him. Thanks again for the responses!

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